Tag Archives: literature

Elmore Leonard On Writing (Part Two)

I’ve quoted Elmore Leonard on this blog before. He passed away this morning, so I thought I’d post another of my favorite things he had to say about the art of writing.

Elmore Leonard on writing: “If it sounds like writing, I rewrite it.”

elmore leonard at his desk

W. Somerset Maugham On Writing

W. Somerset Maugham on writing: “There are three rules for writing a novel. Unfortunately, no one knows what they are.”

W Somerset Maugham

The Short Story is Dead! Long Live the Short Story!

I keep hearing from people who ask why Cemetery Dance Publications even bothers publishing anthologies and collections (or even the magazine!) these days. After all, isn’t the short story dead?

Well, if it is, I guess I didn’t get that memo.

Yes, obviously the heyday of short stories in print has passed. None of us are selling short stories to the Evening News or Saturday Evening Post or even the paperback original anthologies that crowded the bookstores in the ’80s and early ’90s — and those markets aren’t coming back.

But I don’t think the lack of markets means the short story is dead. As long as authors want to write short stories and there are readers who still want to read them, the form will live on. In my experience, there’s definitely still readers who want to read short fiction. Not as many as there once was, but I think there could be more on the way — if only we help younger readers discover the thrill of the short story again.

After all, at least when I was a kid, most of the books I read in middle school and younger were essentially long short stories. You read those little paperbacks until you graduated onto “adult” books.

These days, it seems like all of the emphasis is on writing your big series of novels for younger readers — three books is okay, seven books is great. I keep hearing from authors that their younger readers don’t even KNOW what a short story is, and these readers find it confusing when they stumble across a piece of short fiction.

This confuses me. Have they completely dropped English classes from the curriculum? I know it was fourteen years ago that I last stepped foot into a high school classroom, and in the age of the Internet that’s approximately 1 billion years ago, but I remember having an entire book full of short stories as part of my English class each year.

But even if young readers aren’t being properly introduced to the short story, maybe we can still win them over. Time is in short supply for everyone these days and short stories can be a convenient break from reality for a busy person. You can finish off a short story in less than an hour in most cases. Sometimes ten minutes is all you need. Sometimes a story will take you five minutes to read and yet you’ll still be thinking about it days or months later if the author did his or her job right.

That means you can read a short story on the bus to work. You can read a short story over your lunch break, if you’re not too busy playing Angry Birds. You could even read a short story between classes while walking across your college campus, if you were so inclined.

If the people around you don’t think books are cool, you have nothing to worry about thanks to the rise of eBooks. You can be staring at your cell phone and everyone will think you’re just stumped by the letters you have on Words With Friends. No one has to know you’re actually reading a story. (Although, seriously, if the people you hang out with aren’t into reading, maybe it’s time to expand your horizons a bit and find some additional friends. Try your local library or bookstore while they’re still around.)

I hope short stories will find a way to flourish in the world of eBooks. Some of my short stories are already on Amazon.com right now from a marketing experiment I tried a few years back and I’m pleasantly surprised to see a few of them selling several hundred copies a year with absolutely no promotion at all. That tells me there are still readers for short fiction out there.

What are your thoughts on the short story? Is it a dying form? Or will eBooks bring them back to life?

Elmore Leonard On Writing (Part One)

Elmore Leonard on writing: “I try to leave out the parts that people skip.”

Elmore Leonard

More Than Midnight Review From October Country

More Than Midnight by Brian James Freeman

Blu Gilliand over at October Country has written a tremendously nice review of More Than Midnight, my little horror collection of short stories that was published in December by Cemetery Dance and quickly sold out. As a writer, this is one of those unexpected reviews that just shows up in your “Google Alerts” and makes your entire day. Here is the beginning:

Brian James Freeman is one of those writers that someone, some day, is going to call an “overnight success,” completely ignorant of the fact that the guy has been pounding a keyboard for years, honing his craft and developing his voice the way all good writers do.

You can read the rest over at October Country. In fact, I highly recommend Blu’s suggestion of an “alternate” way to read the book. I wish I had thought of it myself.

And for those who asked, yes, the collection will be out in trade paperback and electronic formats later this year. Thanks again for the support!